Should Public Defender Caseloads Matter for Indigent Defense Outcomes?

Unsurprisingly, I believe the answer is yes; surprisingly, I expect heavy caseloads should improve defense outcomes. My reasoning:

  • Public defenders (PDs) behave as if they are not budget constrained (with respect to trial inputs they supply themselves).
  • Heavy caseloads should increase the probability of seeing any given case continued on a given day.
  • The average indigent defendant is more likely than the average wealthy defendant to have a prior criminal record, and the marginal disutility of additional criminal charges is probably strongly diminishing. In other words, prosecutors quickly lose (or often lack) the ability to tempt indigent defendants with plea bargains that offer features like amended charges with better labor market signaling. Indigent defendants have more taste for trials, which are costly to prosecutors.

(1) strongly suggests that PD clients are relatively more expensive to prosecute, especially at general district court levels where things like (costly) expert testimony are less common. (3) also suggests a level effect; when indigent defendants and relatively wealthy defendants have identical case details, the indigent defendants will probably do somewhat better in terms of trial outcomes as a group. (2) implies that as PD caseloads increase, the probability of continuances across the PD portfolio increase. Sentence maximizing prosecutors will know this, and will be induced to offer more favorable pleas or drop charges as needed.

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