One Weird Trick to Promote Persistent Information Asymmetry

When I first began researching the legal services market, I quickly became aware of the serious information asymmetry problem across the marketplace – especially for criminal defense. As I’ve probably mentioned before, defendants have no real way to estimate the quality of an attorney when considering hiring one for a criminal case (except obviously by consulting Blackstone Trial Analytics, LLC – the trusted name in attorney referrals and quantitative LSM analysis). This is a classic adverse selection problem. Defendants know (or can approximately make themselves aware of) the average outcome of a criminal charge; but they don’t know which attorneys contribute better than average outcomes and which contribute worse than average outcomes.

Ultimately, attorneys seem to set roughly comparable prices for their services and share the market. Of course many defendants would like to pay more for high quality attorneys and probably all defendants would like to avoid low quality attorneys (at least at the prevailing prices). I wondered why (high quality) attorneys didn’t try to solve this problem. They could, for example, publicize their records. But this wouldn’t work if many other attorneys simply didn’t publicize their own records. Probably the public would have a hard time interpreting the record in the context of suppliers of criminal defense services generally. This is especially true if people systematically overrate their probability of success at trial.

More plausibly, I thought, attorneys could make their fees contingent on case outcomes. For example, they could charge some variable amount (by quality) for plea bargains and more for trials – much more where the defendant wins. Obviously any specific deal is possible, including zero or even negative fees. These arrangements, I thought, would probably produce few poor incentives, remove some bad existing incentives and communicate important facts about quality to defendants.

Generally, when there appears to be an obvious and easy solution to fix an apparent market failure, a non-market failure lurks just behind it. This is one of those cases. Here’s the relevant ABA rule:

(d) A lawyer shall not enter into an arrangement for, charge, or collect:

(1) any fee in a domestic relations matter, the payment or amount of which is contingent upon the securing of a divorce or upon the amount of alimony or support, or property settlement in lieu thereof; or

(2) a contingent fee for representing a defendant in a criminal case

 

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